Prof. Dr. Michael S. Northcott
Education, degrees
  • 1983: PhD, Council for National Academic Awards and Sunderland Polytechnic, Sunderland, United Kingdom
  • 1977: MA in Systematic Theology, University of Durham, UK
  • 1976: BA in Theology with Honours, University of Durham, UK
Academic positions and teaching experience
  • 2019–present: Guest Professor of Systematic Theology (Ethics), ETF Leuven
  • 2019–present: Professor of Religion and Ecology at the Indonesian Consortium of Religious Studies at Universitas Gadjah Mada Graduate School in Yogyakarta, Indonesia
  • 2018–present: Honorary Position: Professor Emeritus of Ethics, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • 2018: Guest Professor of Ethics, Theologisches Seminar, University of Heidelberg, Germany
  • 2011–2014: Research Director, School of Divinity, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • 2007–2017: Professor of Ethics, School of Divinity, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • 1998–2000, 2003–2005: Head of Department of Theology and Ethics, School of Divinity, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • 1989–2007: Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, and Reader in Christian Ethics and Practical Theology, School of Divinity, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • 1986–1989: Associate Professor, Southeast Asia Graduate School of Theology, Singapore
  • 1984–1987: Assistant Priest, St Mary’s Cathedral, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  • 1984–1989: Lecturer in Practical Theology and Field Education Director, Seminari Theologi Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  • 1977–1980: Research Assistant, Division of Religion and Philosophy, Sunderland Polytechnic, UK
  • Visiting Professorships: Claremont School of Theology, Claremont Colleges, California, USA (2002); Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences and Divinity School, Duke University, North Carolina, USA (2005); Department of Theology, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia (2008); Centre for Civilisational Dialogue, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (2008); Department of Religion, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, USA (2011); Indonesian Consortium of Religious Studies, Yogyakarta, Indonesia (2013).
Academic memberships
  • Societas Ethica
  • Society for the Study of Christian Ethics
  • International Society for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture (Elected Board Member, as of 2018)
  • European Academy of Religion
  • American Academy of Religion
Selected Bibliography


Books

  • Place, Ecology and the Sacred: The Moral Geography of Sustainable Communities. London: Bloomsbury, 2015.
  • With Peter M. Scott, eds. Systematic Theology and Climate Change: Ecumenical Perspectives. London: Routledge, 2014.
  • A Political Theology of Climate Change. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2013.
  • Cuttle Fish, Clones and Cluster Bombs: Preaching, Ecology and Politics. London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 2010.
  • With Kyle S. Van Houtan, eds. Diversity and Dominion: Dialogues in Ecology, Ethics, and Theology. Foreword by Stanley Hauerwas. Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2010.
  • With R. J. Berry, eds. Theology After Darwin. London: Paternoster Publications, 2009.
  • A Moral Climate: The Ethics of Global Warming. London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 2007.
  • An Angel Directs the Storm: Apocalyptic Religion and American Empire. London: I. B. Tauris, 2004.
  • Life After Debt: Christianity and Global Justice. London: SPCK, 1999.
  • Editor of: Urban Theology: A Reader. Foreword by the Right Reverend George Carey, Archbishop of Canterbury. London: Continuum, 1998.
  • The Environment and Christian Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.
  • Editor of: Aids, Sex and the Scottish Churches. Occasional Paper 29. Edinburgh: Centre for Theology and Public Issues, 1993.
  • Editor of: Vision and Prophecy: The Tasks of Social Theology Today. Occasional Paper 23. Edinburgh: Centre for Theology and Public Issues, 1991.
  • The Church and Secularisation: Urban Industrial Mission in North East England. Studien Zur Interkulturellen Geschichte Des Christentums / Etudes d’histoire Interculturelle Du Christianisme / Studies in the Intercultural History of Christianity 61. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1989.

Journal Articles

  • “Reformed Protestantism and the Origins of Modern Environmentalism.” Philosophia Reformata83, no. 1 (2018): 19–33.
  • “The Queen, the Global Financial Crisis and the Wisdom of R. H. Tawney Northcott.” Crucible: The Journal of Christian Social Ethics, January 2018.
  • “Planetary Moral Economy and Creaturely Redemption in Laudato Si.” Theological Studies77, no. 4 (2016): 886–904. https://doi.org/10.1177/0040563916666820.
  • “Economic Magical Thinking and the Divine Ecology of Love.” Environmental Humanities8, no. 2 (2016): 263–69. https://doi.org/10.1177/0040563916666820.
  • “Myth, Ritual and the New Universe Story in the Inner Hebrides.” Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture9, no. 2 (2015): 192–98. https://doi.org/10.1558/jsrnc.v9i2.27285.
  • “Buddhist Rituals, Mosque Sermons and Marine Turtles: Religion, Ecology and the Conservation of a Dinosaur in West Malaysia.” Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture6, no. 2 (2012): 196–214.
  • “Reading Genesis in Borneo: Work, Guardianship, and Companion Animals in Genesis 2.” PAN: Philosophy Activism Nature8 (2011): 5–13.
  • “Artificial Persons against Nature: Environmental Governmentality, Economic Corporations, and Ecological Ethics.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences1249, no. 1 (2011): 104–17. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2011.06294.x.
  • “Parochial Ecology on St Briavels Common: Rebalancing the Local and the Universal in Anglican Ecclesiology and Practice.” Journal of Anglican Studies10, no. 1 (2012): 68–93. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1740355311000167.
  • “The Failure of Neoliberalism and the Despotism of Numbers: A Political and Theological Critique.” Modern Believing52 (2011): 35–55.
  • “Reading Hauerwas in the Cornbelt: The End of the American Dream and the Church as Polis.” Journal of Religion and Ethics40, no. 2 (2011): 262–80.
  • “Anthropogenic Climate Change, Political Liberalism and the Communion of Saints.” Studies in Christian Ethics24, no. 1 (2011): 34–49.
  • “BP, the Blowout and the Bible Belt: Why Conservative Christianity Does Not Conserve Creation.” Expository Times122, no. 3 (2010): 117–26. https://doi.org/10.1177/0014524610383350.
  • “The Concealments of Carbon Markets and the Publicity of Love in a Time of Climate Change.” International Journal of Public Theology4, no. 3 (2010): 294–313. https://doi.org/10.1163/156973210X510866.
  • “Loving Scripture and Nature.” Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture3, no. 2 (2009): 247–53. https://doi.org/10.1558/jsrnc.v3i2.247.
  • “The War on Terror, the Liberalism of Fear and the Love of Peace in St Augustine’s City of God.” New Blackfriars88, no. 1017 (September 2007): 522–38.
  • “The Weakness of Power and the Power of Weakness: The Ethics of War in a Time of Terror.” Studies in Christian Ethics20, no. 1 (2007): 88–101.
  • “Navigating the Deep Structure of Biological Hyperspace: Divine Providence in an Otherwise Lonely Universe.” Journal of Science and Christian Belief18, no. 1 (2006): 35–40.
  • “Wilderness, Religion, and Ecological Restoration in the Scottish Highlands.” Ecotheology10, no. 3 (2005): 382–99. https://doi.org/10.1558/ecot.2005.10.3.382.
  • “As the Garden Withers, the Desert Grows.” The Tablet259 (2005): 14–15.
  • “Concept Art, Clones and Co-Creators: The Theology of Making.” Modern Theology21, no. 2 (2005): 219–36. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0025.2005.00283.x.
  • “The Parable of the Talents and the Economy of the Gift.” Theology107, no. 838 (2004): 241–49. https://doi.org/10.1177/0040571X0410700402.
  • “‘An Angel Directs the Storm’: The Religious Politics of American Neoconservatism.” Political Theology5, no. 2 (2004): 137–58. https://doi.org/10.1558/poth.2004.5.2.137.
  • “The Market, the Multitude and Metaphysics: Ronald Preston’s Middle Way and the Theological Critique of Economic Reason.” Studies in Christian Ethics17, no. 2 (2004): 104–17. https://doi.org/10.1177/095394680401700215.
  • “Mission and Contextual Theology in West Malaysia.” Swedish Missiological Themes / Svensk Missionstidskrift92 (2004): 611–23.
  • “Do Dolphins Carry the Cross? Biological Moral Realism and Theological Ethics.” New Blackfriars84, no. 994 (2003): 540–53. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-2005.2003.tb06317.x.
  • “From Environmental Utopianism to Parochial Ecology: Communities of Place and the Politics of Sustainability.” Ecotheology, no. 8 (2000): 71–85. https://doi.org/10.1558/ecotheology.v5i1.1796.
  • “Christians, Environment and Society.” Transformation 16 (1999): 102–9.
  • “Is There a Green Christian Ethic?” Studies in Christian Ethics7 (1994): 64–77.
  • “New World Order or New World Enemies? Christianity and the Other in the Post-Cold War World.” New Blackfriars74, no. 872 (1993): 316–27. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-2005.1993.tb07319.x.
  • “New Age Rites: The Recovery of Ritual.” The Way33 (1993): 189–98.
  • “Preston and Hauerwas on Centesimus Annus: Reflections on the Incommensurability of the Liberal and Post-Liberal Mind.” Theology96, no. 769 (1993): 27–35. https://doi.org/10.1177/0040571X9309600104.
  • “Ecumenism and Islamic Resurgence in West Malaysia.” Asia Journal of Theology6 (1992): 263–73.
  • “Salvation in a Post-Industrial Society.” Modern Churchman33 (1991): 21–35.
  • “Christian-Muslim Relations in West Malaysia.” Muslim World81, no. 1 (1991): 48–71.
  • “Urban Theology 1960-1990: Part II.” Crucible: The Journal of Christian Social Ethics19 (1991): 17–24.
  • “Urban Theology 1960-1990: Part I.” Crucible: The Journal of Christian Social Ethics18 (1990): 161–70.
  • “The Case Study Method in Theological Education.” Contact103, no. 3 (1990): 26–32.
  • “A Survey of the Rise of Charismatic Christianity in Malaysia.” Asia Journal of Theology4, no. 1 (1990): 266–78.
  • “Appropriate Ministry Reviewed.” Crucible: The Journal of Christian Social Ethics8 (1980): 33–39.

Book Chapters

  • “Rubbish, Recycling and Religion: Gift, Sacrifice and Waste in Contemporary Bali”, 4th International Conference of Interreligious and Intercultural Studies, Universitas Hindu (Denpasar, Indonesia), 15 February 2020.
  • “From Coleridge to Conservation: The English Romantics and Modern Nature Religion”, Indonesian Association of English Studies (ICONASIA 2019), Universitas Gadjah Mada (Yogyakarta, Indonesia), 6-7 November 2019.
  • “Biofuel Energy, Ancestral Time and the Destruction of Borneo: An Ethical Perspective.” In In Search of Good Energy Policy, edited by Marc Ozawa, Jonathan Chaplin, Michael Pollitt, David Reiner, and Paul Warde, 237–56. Cambridge Studies on Environment, Energy and Natural Resources Governance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019.
  • “Political Economy.” In Wiley Blackwell Companion to Political Theology, edited by William T. Cavanaugh and Peter Manley Scott, 2nd edition., 531–43. Wiley Blackwell Companions to Religion. Hoboken, NJ; Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley Blackwell, 2019.
  • “Neoliberal (Mis)Management of Earth-Time and the Ethics of Climate Justice.” In Climate Change and Its Impacts: Risks and Inequalities, edited by Colleen Murphy, Paolo Gardoni, and Robert McKim, 233–50. Climate Change Management. Cham: Springer, 2018.
  • “My Neighbour and the Ecological Crisis.” In Who Is My Neighbour?: The Global And Personal Challenge, edited by Richard Carter and Samuel Wells. London: SPCK, 2018.
  • “On Going Gently into the Anthropocene.” In Religion and the Anthropocene, edited by Celia Deane-Drummond, Sigurd Bergmann, and Markus Vogt, Foreword by Heinrich Bedford-Strohm., 19–34. Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2017.
  • “Climate Change and Christian Ethics.” In Wiley Blackwell Companion to Religion and Ecology, edited by John Hart, 286–300. Wiley Blackwell Companions to Religion. Hoboken, NJ; Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley Blackwell, 2017.
  • “Lynn White Jr. Right and Wrong: The Anti-Ecological Character of Latin Christianity, and the Pro-Ecological Turn of Protestantism.” In Religion and Ecological Crisis: The “Lynn White Thesis” at Fifty, edited by Todd LeVasseur and Anna Peterson, 61–74. Routledge Studies in Religion. New York: Routledge, 2017.
  • “Eschatology in the Anthropocene: From the Chronos of Deep Time to the Kairos of the Age of Humans.” In The Anthropocene and the Global Environmental Crisis: Rethinking Modernity in a New Epoch, edited by Clive Hamilton, François Gemenne, and Christophe Bonneuil, 87–99. Routledge Environmental Humanities. New York: Routledge, 2015.
  • “Crop Science, the Heisenberg Principle and Resistance to Genetically Modified Organisms.” In The Anthropocene and the Global Environmental Crisis: Rethinking Modernity in a New Epoch, edited by Phil Macnaghten and Susana Carro-Ripalda, 198–204. Pathways to Sustainability. New York: Routledge, 2015.
  • “Holy Spirit.” In Systematic Theology and Climate Change: Ecumenical Perspectives, edited by Michael S. Northcott and Peter M. Scott, 51–68. London: Routledge, 2014.
  • “Girard, Climate Change and Apocalypse.” In Can We Survive Our Origins: Readings in René Girard’s Theory of Violence and the Sacred, edited by Pierpaolo Antonello and Susana Carro-Ripalda, Foreword by Rowan Williams, 287–310. Studies in Violence, Mimesis, & Culture. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University, 2015.
  • “Ecocide and Christian Natural Law.” In Searching for a Universal Ethic: Multidisciplinary, Ecumenical, and Interfaith Responses to the Catholic Natural Law Tradition, edited by John Berkman and William C. Matison, III, 179–90. Grand Rapids, MI; Cambridge: Eerdmans, 2014.
  • “Whose Danger, Which Climate? Mesopotamian versus Liberal Accounts of Climate Justice.” In Linking Ecology and Ethics for a Changing World, edited by Ricardo Rozzi, S.T.A. Pickett, Clare Palmer, Juan J. Armesto, and J. Baird Callicott, 241–50. Ecology and Ethics 1. Dordrecht; Heidelberg; London; New York: Springer, 2013.
  • “Embodying Climate Change: Renarrating Energy Through the Senses and the Spirit.” In Human-Environment Relations: Transformative Values in Theory and Practice, edited by Emily Brady and Pauline Pheminster, 97–108. Dordrecht; Heidelberg; London; New York: Springer, 2012.
  • “Reading Genesis in Borneo: Work, Guardianship and Companion Animals in Genesis 2.” In Genesis and Christian Theology, edited by Nathan MacDonald, Mark W. Elliott, and Grant Macaskill, 190–203. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2012.
  • “Fair Trade and Human Wellbeing.” In The Practices of Happiness: Political Economy, Religion and Wellbeing, edited by John Atherton, Elaine Graham, and Ian Steedman, 98–110. Routledge Frontiers of Political Economy. London: Routledge, 2011.
  • “Anthropogenic Climate Change and the Truthfulness of Trees.” In Religion and Dangerous Environmental Change: Transdisciplinary Perspectives on the Ethics of Climate and Sustainability, edited by Sigurd Bergmann and Dieter Gerten, 103–18. Studies in Religion and the Environment / Studien Zur Religion Und Umwelt 2. Berlin: LIT, 2010.
  • “The Church and the Genomic Project to Secure the Human Future.” In God, Ethics and the Human Genome: Theological, Legal and Scientific Perspectives, edited by Mark Bratton, 102–15. London: Church House Publishing, 2009.
  • “Earth Left Behind? Ecological Readings of the Apocalypse of John in Contemporary America.” In The Way the World Ends? Revelation and Its Reception, edited by William John Lyons and Jorunn Økland, 112–31. Sheffield: Phoenix Press, 2009.
  • “Atmospheric Space, Climate Change and the Communion of Saints.” In Nature, Space and the Sacred: Transdisciplinary Perspectives, edited by Sigurd Bergmann, Peter Manley Scott, M. Jansdotter Samuelson, and H. Bedford-Strohm, 57–74. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2009.
  • “’Who Am I?’ Human Identity and the Spiritual Disciplines in the Witness of Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” In Who Am I? Bonhoeffer’s Theology Through His Poetry, edited by Bernd Wannenwetsch, 11–29. T & T Clark Theology. London: T & T Clark, 2009.
  • “Unmasking Empire: Christian Utopianism and the Transfiguration of Politics.” In Transfiguring the World Through the Word − Encounter between Eastern Orthodoxy and Radical Orthodoxy, edited by Adrian Pabst and Christoph Schneider, 93–108. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2009.
  • “‘They Shall Not Hurt or Destroy in All My Holy Mountain’ (Isaiah 62.25): Killing for Philosophy and a Creaturely Theology of Non-Violence.” In Creaturely Theology: On God, Humans and Other Animals, edited by Celia Deane Drummond and David Clough, 231–48. London: SCM Press, 2009.
  • “Climate Change, Political Liberalism and the Body of Christ.” In Økoteologi: Kontekstuelle Perspektiver På Miljø Og Teologi [Ecotheology: Contextual Perspectives on Environment and Theology], edited by Bård Mæland and Tom Sverre Tomren, 105–24. Trondheim: Tapir Akademisk Forlag, 2007. “Sustaining Ethical Life in the Anthropocene.” In Creation in Crisis: Christian Perspectives on Sustainability, edited by Robert S. White, 96–110. London: SPCK, 2009.
  • “The Desire for Speed and the Rhythm of the Earth.” In The Ethics of Mobilities: Rethinking Place, Exclusion, Freedom and Environment, edited by Sigurd Bergmann and Tore Sager, 215–32. Transport and Society. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008.
  • “Eucharistic Eating, and Why Many Early Christians Preferred Fish.” In Eating and Believing: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Vegetarianism and Theology, edited by David Grummet and Rachel Muers, 232–46. T & T Clark Theology. London: Bloomsbury T & T Clark, 2008.
  • “The World Trade Organisation, Fair Trade and the Body Politics of Saint Paul.” In Through the Eye of a Needle: Theological Conversations over Political Economy, edited by John Atherton and Hannah Skinner, 169–88. Peterborough, UK: Epworth Press, 2007.
  • “Theology and Human Rights: A Self-Evident Truth?” In Tolerance and Truth: The Spirit of the Age or the Spirit of God?, edited by Angus Morrison, Introduction by D. A. Carson, 115–37. Edinburg Dogmatics Conference Papers. Edinburgh: Rutherford House, 2007.
  • “In the Waters of Babylon: The Moral Geography of the Embryo.” In Future Perfect? God, Medicine and Human Identity, edited by Celia Deane Drummond and Peter Manley Scott, 73–86. London: T & T Clark, 2006.
  • “Soil, Stewardship and Spirit in the Era of Chemical Agriculture.” In Environmental Stewardship: Critical Perspectives – Past and Present, edited by R. J. Berry, 213–19. London: T & T Clark, 2006.
  • “Atonement, Violence and Modern Imperial Order.” In Consuming Passion: Why the Killing of Jesus Really Matters, edited by Simon Barrow and Jonathan Bartley, 9–98. London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 2005.
  • “Farmed Salmon and the Sacramental Feast: How Christian Worship Resists Global Capitalism.” In Public Theology for the 21st Century: Essays in Honour of Duncan B. Forrester, edited by William F. Storrar and Andrew Morton, Foreword by Raymond Plant, 213–30. London: T & T Clark, 2004.
  • “Ecological Crisis and Environmental Ethics.” In Listening to Creation Groaning: Reports and Papers from a Consultation on Creation Theology Organised by the European Christian Environmental Network at the John Knox International Reformed Centre from March 28 to April 1, 2004, edited by Lukas Vischer, 211–29. Geneva: Centre international réformé John Knox, 2004.
  • “Being Silent: Time in the Spirit.” In The Blackwell Companion to Christian Ethics, edited by Stanley Hauerwas and Samuel Wells, 414–26. Blackwell Companions to Religion. Malden, MA; Oxford: Blackwell, 2004.
  • “The Word in Time and Space.” In Faithfulness in the City, edited by John Vincent, 244–65. Hawarden: Monad Press, 2003.
  • “‘Behold I Have Set the Land before You’ (Deut. 1.8): Christian Ethics, GM Foods, and the Culture of Modern Farming.” In Reordering Nature: Theology, Society and the New Genetics, edited by Celia Deane Drummond, Bronislaw Szerszynski, and Robin Grove-White, 85–106. London; New York: T & T Clark, 2003.
  • “Sabbaths, Shamans and Superquarries in Scotland: Environment and Religion in a Contested Landscape.” In Nature, Production, Power: Towards an Ecological Political Economy, edited by Fred P. Gale and R. Michael M’Gonigle, 17–34. Cheltenham; Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar, 2000.
  • “The Declaration and the Spirit of Environmentalism.” In The Care of Creation: Focusing Concern and Action, edited by R. J. Berry, 62–73. Leicester: InterVarsity Press, 2000.
  • “Ecology and Christian Ethics.” In Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics, edited by Robin Gill, 209–27. Cambridge Companions to Religion. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. (Reprinted under the same title in the 2nd edition: 219–38. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012.)
  • “The Case Study Method in Theological Education.” In Spiritual Dimensions of Pastoral Care: Practical Theology in a Multidisciplinary Context, edited by David Willows and John Swinton, Foreword by Don Browning, 59–65. London: Jessica Kingsley, 2000.
  • “The Moral Standing of Nature and the New Natural Law.” In The Revival of Natural Law: Philosophical, Theological and Ethical Responses to the Finnis-Grisez School, edited by Nigel Biggar and Rufus Black, 262–82. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000.
  • “Pastoral Theology and Social Science.” In The Blackwell Reader in Pastoral and Practical Theology, edited by James Woodward and Stephen Pattison, 151–63. Blackwell Readings in Modern Theology. Malden, MA; Oxford: Blackwell, 2000.
  • “Cloning: Promice of Immortality—or Threat?” In God for the 21st Century, edited by Russell Stannard, 92–96. Philadelphia, PA; London: Templeton Foundation Press, 2000.
  • “Response to Paul Badham.” In Euthanasia and the Churches, edited by Robin Gill, 69–73. Christian Ethics in Dialogue. London: Cassell, 1998.
  • “Christian Futures, Postmodernity and the State of Britain.” In Faith and Praxis in a Postmodern World, edited by Ursula King, 175–96. London: Cassell, 1998.
  • “Sociological Approaches [to the Study of Religion].” In Approaches to the Study of Religion, edited by Peter Connolly, Foreword by Ninian Smart, 193–225. London: T & T Clark, 1998.
  • “A Place of Our Own.” In God in the City: Essays and Reflections of the Archbishop of Canterbury’s Urban Theology Group, edited by Peter Sedgwick, 119–52. London: Mowbray, 1995.
  • “Introduction: The Church with Aids.” In Aids, Sex and the Scottish Churches, edited by Michael S. Northcott, 5–17. Occasional Paper 29. Edinburgh: Centre for Theology and Public Issues, 1993.
  • “Identity and Decline in the Kirk.” In Seeing Scotland – Seeing Christ, 43–64. Occasional Paper 28. Edinburgh: Centre for Theology and Public Issues, 1993.
  • “The Eucharist.” In Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry. A Malaysian Contribution, edited by Yeoh Seng Guan, 24–40. Ecumenism in Malaysia Series 2. Petaling Jaya, Malaysia: Council of Churches of Malaysia, 1992.
  • “Two Hundred Years of Anglican Mission in West Malaysia.” In Christianity in Malaysia: A Denominational History, edited by Lee Kam Hing, W. John Roxborogh, and Robert Hunt, 34–74. Petaling Jaya, Malaysia: Pelanduk, 1992.

Select Academic Presentations

  • “Keynote webcast discussion with Norman Wirzba of Duke University,” Ecology and Religion in Nineteenth Century Studies, University of Lancaster and Baylor University TX, 18-21 September 2019.
  • “Religion and the Science of Climate Destabilisation: The Case for (Re)Entanglement,” After Science and Religion Templeton Colloquium, University of Cambridge, 11-13 July 2019.
  • “Ecology,” Interdisciplinary Seminar, Evangelical Theological Faculty, Leuven, 17-18 June 2019.
  • “Ethical Entanglements of Humans with Nonhumans in the Anthropocene,” Transdisciplinary Colloquium on ‘Political Theology at the Edge: Collectivities of Crisis and Possibility’, Drew University, New Jersey, 29-31 March 2019.
  • “Creaturely Ethics in the Anthropocene,” Heidelberg Centre for the Environment, 12 November 2018.
  • “Religion and Ecology from the Romantics to Rewilding,” an invited keynote presentation at the symposium on religion and climate change: ‘The Sixth Extinction: Interreligious Insights, Warnings and Questions’, Dublin City University Centre for Interreligious Dialogue, 19 September 2018.
  • “Gaia, Capitalism and the Climate Regime” at the conference entitled ‘Is the Climate Change movement losing its momentum?’ Heidelberg Centre for Public Health, 5 June 2018.
  • “Guardians of the Forest: Indigenous Land Rights and the Conservation of Creatures,” plenary paper at the ‘Colloque de la Chaire Bien commun’, Institut Catholique de Paris, 5-6 April 2018.
  • “Indigenous Peoples, Land Rights and Care for Creatures,” a keynote at the conference ‘Radical Ecological Conversion After Laudato Si: Discovering the intrinsic Value of all Creatures, Human and Non-human’ at the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome, 7-8 March 2018.
  • “Biofuel energy, capital time and the destruction of Borneo: an ethical perspective,” Oxford University Centre for the Environment, South Parks Road, 26 January 2018.
  • “Political Theology in the Anthropocene Epoch,” the conference entitled ‘The Futures of Public Theology’ hosted by Centre for Theology and Public Issues, University of Edinburgh, 30 November-1 December 2017.
  • “The Ambiguity of Hope in the Epoche of the Anthropocene,” Society for the Study of Christian Ethics, Westcott House, Cambridge, 7-9 September 2017.
  • “Earthly Time and Environmental Justice: Findings from the Ancestral Time,” a keynote address at the AHRC-funded workshop ‘Faith Communities and Environmental Activism’, held at the University of Edinburgh, 18-20 May 2017.
  • “The Reformation and the Care of Creation,” an invited public lecture at the Myanmar Institute of Theology, Yangon, Myanmar, 7 May 2017.
  • “The Romantics, the English Lake District, and the Sacredness of High Land: Mountains as Hierophanic Places in the Origins of Environmentalism and Nature Conservation,” a panel presentation at the ‘Mountains and Sacred Landscapes’ Conference at the New School, Manhattan, NYC of the International Society for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture and the India China Institute, the New School, 20-23 April 2017.
  • “Brexit, Trump and the Common Good,” Interdisciplinary Seminar, Drew University, New Jersey, 17 April 2017.
  • “How engagements with local nonhumans might connect British environmentalism with the new archaism and localism of post-Brexit British politics,” Plenary panel presentation for interdisciplinary seminar ‘Environmental Humanities: Doing Interdisciplinarity with Depth’, Bath Spa University Research Centre for Environmental Humanities, 15-16 December 2016.
  • “The global common good after Brexit and Trump: Liberalism and its Discontents,” University Centre Saint Ignatius International Workshop on Sustainable Development and the Contribution of the Churches, University of Antwerp, 7-9 December 2016.
  • “Reformation Christianity and Care for Creation,” Association for Reformational Philosophy and Evangelische Theologishe Facultet, Leuven, 15-19 August, 2016.
  • “Enchantments of Earthly Time: From the Romantics to Scottish Faith-Based Ecological Activists,” International Conference ‘Wonder and the Natural World’, Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society University of Indiana, Bloomington, 20-23 June 2016.
  • “Time, Ecology and Ethics: Intergenerational Responsibility and Climate Change Mitigation,” International Workshop on ‘Climate change and its impacts: risks and inequalities’, Dept. of Environmental Engineering and Dept. of Religion, University of Champaign Urbana, Illinois, 10-11 March 2016.